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What Grows: It’s Time to Start Tucking In for Winter

More long-legged petunias, lily plantings and Edmonton’s first aroid show

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QI received a sturdy rosebush as a gift this summer. still in the pan. how do i get through the winter When is the best time to plant?

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A If it were me, I would plant in autumn. It can be planted up to several weeks before temperatures drop below freezing. It’s a great time for many plants to bargain, and because of the cooler days, planting at this time of year is less stressful for the plants.

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Planting at least a few weeks before freezing gives the plants a chance to take root and start developing roots. You don’t want it growing too fast, as this type of growth can be damaged during the winter.

Collecting potted perennials and shrubs together and covering them with a thick layer of leaves is a good way to protect plants from Oldman Winter's wrath.
Collecting potted perennials and shrubs together and covering them with a thick layer of leaves is a good way to protect plants from Oldman Winter’s wrath. Photo by Mary Ann Van Berlo /File

long-legged green

Q I am wondering why many of my plants grow to enormous heights and spread widely. My daughter started them with seeds. Most of it she saved from her own plants in her previous years. At issue are petunias (also much more faded), marigolds and painted tongues. They also didn’t flower until in season. Any wisdom on this point?

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A There could be several reasons for the tall and wide growth you describe, and it is described as “long-legged”. Its leg length may be due to lack of light. Approximately 6 hours of direct sunlight per day is required. I’m also curious about the type of fertilizer used. Higher nitrogen (first number in formula) promotes rapid growth with more leaves than flowers. For flowering plants, formulas like 5-10-5 or 15-30-15 are best is. In one of the pictures you sent, the planter boxes also looked a bit crowded.

Petunias also grow better with a little mid-season pruning.In early July, prune back 20% of the plant to stimulate new growth and blooms, as well as other stem heights. Proven Winners has better information about petunias.

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Review of planting depth

Q Recently, another reader advised me that perhaps I planted the licorice too deep. I did this too, and 3 iris plants. Unfortunately you didn’t mention if there is any remedy for this. Can plants be dug up and repotted? If so, when is the best time? If not, do I need to replace the plant?

A Don’t you hate it when you ask a question and get a reasonable answer, but no solution? I know I do and I apologize for the omission.

You can definitely save daylilies that have been planted too deeply. The best time to do this is in the spring, when new shoots are just beginning to emerge. Carefully dig around the plant, trying to get as many roots into the ball as possible. The less damaged or disturbed roots, the better. Mix the bonemeal into the soil and compost well. Check the height by inserting the root ball into the hole and ensure that the crown of the plant is 2.5 cm below the ground. If it’s too low, add organics to the bottom of the hole.

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aroid show

You can find some of the more interesting houseplants at Edmonton’s first Aroid and Vivarium Show as you move into the indoor growing season.Aroid It belongs to the Araceae family and includes many common houseplants such as Aglaonema, Monstera, Philodendron and Pothos. A vivarium is a closed space in which plants are kept, much like a terrarium, except that animals such as insects and reptiles are included for observation and study, and all of the above are displayed and I hope it will be sold.

Illa Jones and Mantis. She uses it for her pest control on her own fish farm.
Illa Jones and Mantis. She uses it for her pest control on her own fish farm. Photo by Greg Southam /post media
The show will be held at St. Basil’s Cultural Centre, 10819 71 Ave. on September 24th and 25th from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm.

For more information, email your question to filipskigerald@gmail.com, read past columns in the Life section of edmontonjournal.com, or read my book Just Ask Jerry. You can also follow me on Twitter @justaskjerry.

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What Grows: It’s Time to Start Tucking In for Winter

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