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Vintage 1960s Bob Lewis home for sale in North Vancouver, ‘rare’ find

Once owned by rough-and-tumble journalist Jack Brooks, the house was built by Bob Lewis Construction, the man behind many modern homes in the Lower Mainland in the 1950s and ’60s.

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Jack Brooks is a classic old-fashioned newsman who was the go-to man for the Vancouver Sun’s big stories in the 1960s.

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He marched with Dr. Martin Luther King in Selma, Alabama, chronicled America’s early involvement in Vietnam during the civil rights era, and in 1963 served as the Sun’s Washington, DC bureau chief for the assassination of the President of the United States. was interviewed. John F. Kennedy.

But underneath his brusque exterior was a secret: He lived in a very cool, modern house at 508 Greenway in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver.

The two-story, 2,500-square-foot stilt-and-beam home had an open floor plan, mahogany-paneled walls, two beautiful fireplaces in the living room and recreation room, and angled ceilings made of fir. The living room is upstairs and feels like you are in the trees. Large windows and wraparound balconies enhance the “outside-in” feel.

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It’s all very modern and a way of life that many people prefer today. However, the house was built by Bob Lewis Construction in his 1960s and sold for $21,000. Brooks he bought in 1968 for probably about $28,000. He died in 1986 when he was just 61 years old, but his wife Marian lived in this house until her death last year at the age of 95.

The house is now on the market for $1.995 million for the first time in 54 years.

Not so long ago, houses like this were demolished and replaced with larger modern homes. But real estate agent Trent Rodney has successfully marketed modern vintage homes on the West Coast. He sold his stylish West Vancouver home designed by Arthur Erickson for $4.3 million.

The Bob Lewis house is not as architecturally distinctive as those designed by architects such as Ericsson, Ron Thom, and Fred Hollingsworth in the 1950s and ’60s. Lewis was a designer and builder, not an architect. But like Joseph Eichler did in California, he took elements of West Coast modern style and incorporated them into his mass-market homes. rice field.

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“The story is that Bob Lewis designed one-third of all West Coast modern homes on the North Shore,” said Rodney. “[But]most of them[often]were demolished in the 80s and 90s.”

The open living space of the Brooks House has no partition between the dining room and the living room, and large windows and decks let in the outside air.
The open living space of the Brooks House has no partition between the dining room and the living room, and large windows and decks let in the outside air. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg

That said, there are still quite a few Bob Lewis homes left, especially on the North Shore.

“They are a little like mushrooms,” said Kate Brooks, one of Brooks’ four children. “When you walk into a neighborhood, you see four he or five Lewis within a few block radius.”

What makes the Brooks Lewis home special is that it has never been altered.It is more or less the way it was built in 1960.

“Everything here is original,” said Rodney. “It’s very rare to find a pristine Bob Lewis. A lot of people in the ’80s and his ’90s made updates that didn’t fit the design, so people effectively ruined them. ”

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Trent Rodney at 508 Greenway Avenue, West Vancouver, British Columbia, July 27, 2022. (NICK PROCAYLO/PNG)
Trent Rodney at 508 Greenway Avenue, West Vancouver, British Columbia, July 27, 2022. (NICK PROCAYLO/PNG) Photo by NICK PROCAYLO /PNG

Rodney markets this house as a vine house, after the vine planter at the top of the second floor stairs. Naturally, it’s angled, giving it a little extra je ne sais quoi.

He points out that there are three bedrooms upstairs, so a small family could fit on the ground floor. This means he can turn the ground floor into his two-bedroom suite for extra income. The downstairs recreation room is the same size as the upstairs living room, with the same mahogany walls and brick fireplace.

The recreation room on the first floor of the Brooks family, with the same design as the living room on the second floor.
The recreation room on the first floor of the Brooks family, with the same design as the living room on the second floor. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg

Adaptability is one of Lewis’ home’s selling points.

“A house is like a big box,” Bob Lewis said in a 1959 Sun article about the Lewis home, which won an award from the Canadian Housing Design Council. “It is possible to arrange the interior walls in different ways.”

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By the way, Rodney’s first news release featured the Brooks house as the former home of Time magazine’s Vancouver correspondent.

Born in Keighley, Yorkshire, England, he was invited to Canada in 1955 by his old colleague Paddy Sherman.

“My dad went home and told my mom, ‘I’m moving to Canada,'” said Kate Brooks. “Those were days without consultation. We’re moving to Canada. I’ve booked a trip, I’m leaving by ship next week, and you start packing.”

Brooks moved to The Sun a few years later. He became the Washington, D.C. bureau chief of the newspaper, and his family bought a house in Greenway when he returned from America.

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Kate Brooks said the open design made it a great home for her family.

“My mother loved this house. I love this house,” she said.

Then she laughed.

“My father, his life was work and golf. And drinking and smoking and socializing and politics. , loved the whole look of Lewis.

It’s easy to see why. Sixty years after its construction, Brooks’ home is cooler than ever.

jmackie@postmedia.com

Former Vancouver Sun reporter Jack Brooks, September 9, 1963. Brooks was one of the newspaper's star reporters in the 1950s and 1960s, and later became the city's editor. This may have been taken when he was appointed Washington DC bureau chief for The Sun. The print was retouched by an unknown artist, adding extra ash to Brooks' cigarette and even wafting smoke.
Former Vancouver Sun reporter Jack Brooks, September 9, 1963. Brooks was one of the newspaper’s star reporters in the 1950s and 1960s, and later became the city’s editor. This may have been taken when he was appointed Washington DC bureau chief for The Sun. The print was retouched by an unknown artist, adding extra ash to Brooks’ cigarette and even wafting smoke.
Jack Brooks, former reporter for the Vancouver Sun, March 17, 1981. Brooks was one of the newspaper's star reporters in the 1950s and 1960s, and later became the city's editor.
Jack Brooks, former reporter for the Vancouver Sun, March 17, 1981. Brooks was one of the newspaper’s star reporters in the 1950s and 1960s, and later became the city’s editor.
The exterior of Brooks' house in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver, surrounded by trees.
The exterior of Brooks’ house in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver, surrounded by trees. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg
The dining room of the Brooks home in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver.
The dining room of the Brooks home in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg
The fireplace and wood-paneled walls of the Brooks home in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver.
The fireplace and wood-paneled walls of the Brooks home in the Delbrook neighborhood of North Vancouver. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg
The open living space of the Brooks House has no partition between the dining room and the living room, and large windows and decks let in the outside air.
The open living space of the Brooks House has no partition between the dining room and the living room, and large windows and decks let in the outside air. Photo credit: Dan Kirchner Dan Kirchner /jpg
An advertisement for the Bob Lewis home at 508 Greenway, North Vancouver, June 30, 1960. The original price of this house was $21,000 for him.
An advertisement for the Bob Lewis home at 508 Greenway, North Vancouver, June 30, 1960. The original price of this house was $21,000 for him.
Bob Lewis in front of the award-winning home he built in North Vancouver in 1959.
Bob Lewis in front of the award-winning home he built in North Vancouver in 1959.
Jack Brooks' story about Jacqueline Kennedy on November 23, 1963, in the Vancouver Sun, the day after her husband, US President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated.
Jack Brooks’ story of Jacqueline Kennedy on November 23, 1963, in the Vancouver Sun, the day after her husband, US President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated.
Part 2 of Jack Brooks' story about Jacqueline Kennedy on November 23, 1963, in the Vancouver Sun, the day after her husband, US President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated.
Part 2 of Jack Brooks’ story about Jacqueline Kennedy on November 23, 1963, in the Vancouver Sun, the day after her husband, US President John F. Kennedy, was assassinated.

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Vintage 1960s Bob Lewis home for sale in North Vancouver, ‘rare’ find

Source link Vintage 1960s Bob Lewis home for sale in North Vancouver, ‘rare’ find

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