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Ukrainian flag popping out of the door at the Victoria flag store

“The day the Russians crossed the border, we sold everything we had in 20 minutes.”

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Blue and yellow fabrics are declining rapidly at the flagship stores in downtown Paul Servos.

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Printed custom-made Ukrainian flags have popped out of the door since Russian troops invaded Ukraine last Thursday, according to Servos.

“The day the Russians crossed the border, we sold everything we had in 20 minutes,” he said. “Now I’m trying to make as many things as possible as soon as possible before I run out of supplies.”

Servos, his wife, Maggie Rennick, and Freyja Zazu, a seamstress, cut and sew two-color Ukrainian flags non-stop, about a day with one sewing machine and limited workspace. I am making 20 flags. By Monday, 76 bespoke flags had floated in the air in various parts of the region.

They raised a 12-foot flag with the Ukrainian Canadian Cultural Center (which was prominently featured at a parliamentary rally on Sunday) and another flag currently flying over Hotel Grand Pacific in Inner Harbor.

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Servos also created the Ukrainian flags of Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay to fly in the city square. We also have dozens more fabrics ready before the polyester material runs out.

Flags printed with Servos numbers will begin to arrive from China in about two weeks. Ironically, Russia has not participated in the global criticism of Russia.

According to Servos, the blue and yellow material for custom flags could follow further.

“We have a lot of orders, but we can’t fill them all at this time. People are stopping by the store. They want to show their support for Ukraine.”

Renick, whose grandparents emigrated from Ukraine to Canada in the early 1900s, said Victorian people supported Canada by making small flags out of colored paper and using similar colors from fabrics. He said he could also show.

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The Russian invasion shocked Renick and provided the Saskatchewan natives with an opportunity to explore her heritage. Her family’s name was originally Hrynyk, but she said it was changed to Rennick because it’s easier for Canadians to understand and write.

Her grandparents and parents never taught the language to the next generation because “they were embarrassed at the time.”

Renick said she is doing what she can to help Ukraine with which she still has a relationship. “What happened is horrifying. These are ordinary people like us and are involved in the war by tyrants,” she said.

Some have been asked if the staff could help raise the flag, according to Servos, but the store and machines are in limited space and sewing is limited to one machine. “We are moving as fast as we can,” he said. “We are really grateful for how people are reacting. We are a small company doing what we can to make a difference.”

dkloster@timescolonist.com

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Ukrainian flag popping out of the door at the Victoria flag store

Source link Ukrainian flag popping out of the door at the Victoria flag store

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