Canada

Two Vancouver companies offer solutions to reduce single-use to-go packaging

Metro Vancouver’s 12th Annual Zero Waste Conference will be held Wednesday and Thursday at the Vancouver Convention Center.

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Single-use packaging is widely believed to contribute to the environmental crisis, but two local startups want to change that concept with reusable containers, one at a time.

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Resuables.com and ShareWares are Vancouver companies working to normalize the circular economy, which has a huge impact on reducing waste.

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Cody Irwin is CEO and founder of ShareWares, which partners with cafes and restaurants such as Tim Hortons. body energy clubimplements a reusable cup borrowing system.

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Irwin ran a corporate food delivery company. However, like many other businesses, it didn’t survive due to customer decline. Still, with all the infrastructure set up, Metro has switched gears to a new venture that will contribute to Vancouver’s circular economy.

the way of thinking is similar To the deposit fee for soda cans.

In the case of coffee cups, consumers ask to fill a borrowed cup at one of the participating companies, pay a small reuse fee, and return it to one of the collection bins.

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To find the closest bin, consumers can use their mobile phones to scan the QR code on the cup.

ShareWares then receives the cups, cleans and inspects them. Then scan the cup and refund the consumer via e-transfer. The clean cup is returned to the coffee shop and reused over and over again.

ShareWares has other services such as providing reusable containers for offices, events, food trucks and grocery stores. We also offer cleaning services and have expanded to offer reusable takeaway tableware.

Irwin said it’s all about normalizing the culture so people get used to renting containers rather than using disposable items that end up in landfills.

“It’s about raising awareness. People think, ‘I have paper cups, but other people have reusable cups.'” It becomes social and it starts to change and change behavior,” Erwin said.

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Hawkins will be speaking next week at Metro Vancouver’s 12th Annual Zero Waste Conference at the Vancouver Convention Center on Wednesday and Thursday.

The conference will bring together business leaders, community innovators and policy makers to discuss new ideas for realizing a circular economy – zero waste ideas.

Online registration for Metro’s Zero Waste Conference closes at noon on Tuesday.

Jason Hawkins, CEO and co-founder of Reusables.com, will also speak at the conference. He’s on a mission to make it easier for people to not only order reusable containers with take-out food and drinks, but to do so automatically.

“How can we reuse defaults instead of just choosing? I think we’re headed in because I think we need to remove barriers to adopting more sustainable packaging solutions.” He said.

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“Not just a choice for hardcore zero waste … we need this to be everywhere in society.”

Diners can sign up and use the resuables.com app. When ordering from a delivery service like DoorDash, you can choose from restaurants that support resuables.com, such as Earls, with the option of reusable stainless steel containers. The member simply enters her reusable ID number and the food is cooked on the tableware so there is no waste. Participation fee is $5 per month.

Consumers then have 14 days to drop the container at any participating location for disinfection and reuse. The company has nearly 100 of his locations, most of them in the Metro He Vancouver area, but plans are to expand around BC, across Canada, and the United States.

“Waste is like a gateway drug to climate change. That’s the way I think about it,” said Irwin.

Hawkins made a similar point, saying that climate change and biodiversity loss are related to waste and society’s throwaway culture.

“Many experts suggest that reuse in a circular economy is the most sustainable and potentially the most cost-effective method,” said Hawkins.

ticrawford@postmedia.com

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Two Vancouver companies offer solutions to reduce single-use to-go packaging

Source link Two Vancouver companies offer solutions to reduce single-use to-go packaging

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