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Saskatchewan emergency care workers have increased naloxone doses by nearly 500% since 2019

The last few years have hit the rescuers a lot.

In the case of emergency medical care, the tolls show no signs of slowing down. They have seen an almost 500 percent increase in the number of doses of naloxone given since 2019.

“We were expecting it, but the numbers are very disturbing to us and show the stress we are seeing on the streets for our paramedics,” Medaby said. Troy Davis, director of public relations at Health Services West, said.

In 2021, paramedics received 609 doses of opioid overdose reversal, 132 doses in 2019 and 370 doses in 2020. These are doses given only by paramedics and do not include other first responders.

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Davis says overdose calls occur throughout Saskatoon and there are no hotspots in the city.

“We are seeing more powerful medicines out there, and it needs more doses,” Davis said. “We had one patient who took up to eight doses, which is a completely different issue we have never seen before.”

Emergency medical personnel can now extend their help. The ambulance is equipped with a naloxone kit that can be distributed to bystanders when answering overdose calls.

At Prairie Harm Reduction, staff and naloxone demand has increased significantly.

“Last year we distributed over 7,000 naloxone kits. We know that overdose deaths are increasing everywhere due to the increase in fentanyl throughout our community and state,” said PHR Executive Director. Director Kayla De Mong said.

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DeMong urges the state to consider a comprehensive drug strategy and invest more in substance use disorders.

“Last year we provided the highest service of all programs,” said De Mong. “Our safe consumer site supported 577 people.”

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The PHR Drop-in Center also serves approximately 450-500 people daily.

Despite the precautions taken by PHRs and first responders, Davis does not expect naloxone usage to decline soon.

“When we see these populations grow, as we saw in Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton, we see them grow,” Davis said.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.



Saskatchewan emergency care workers have increased naloxone doses by nearly 500% since 2019

Source link Saskatchewan emergency care workers have increased naloxone doses by nearly 500% since 2019

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