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Mounty, who witnessed police shooting, says he believed victim was suspect, not witness

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When two fellow cavalrymen opened fire on the occupants of a pickup truck, an RCMP officer present at the scene said they had met with a deadly encounter, believing it was making a high-risk arrest of the shooting suspect. I’m here.

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Constant Ian Paddick stood up Thursday and Friday at the Const trial. Jessica Brown and Cpl. Randy Stegner, who faced three charges against him, including manslaughter on July 3, 2018, shot and killed Clayton Crawford near Whitecourt.

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A nine-year veteran with the RCMP described the moments leading up to the shooting. He, Brown, and Stinger approached Crawford’s purple Dodge his pickup at the Chickadee Creek rest stop on Highway 43 with weapons drawn.

Jurors on Thursday viewed video of the incident captured by all three RCMP vehicle dashcams.

Paddick told the court, “We approached the vehicle from the driver’s side. He explained that one of the officers saw a hairy, skinny man sleeping behind the wheel.

“I don’t remember who tried to open the door first, but we tried to open it. Stenger the carbine.

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“I pulled a taser and tried to open the door, but it was locked. I knocked on the window and the man woke up. . He basically put his hands up in front of him, looked at me and dived under his column steering. “

Paddick then pulled his baton, smashed the driver’s side window, and unsuccessfully tried to push Crawford back into his seat. Someone opened the driver’s door. Eventually the truck reversed and swayed forward to the east when Brown and Stenger opened fire. The truck slowed down before hitting the treeline on the north side of the highway.

An autopsy revealed that Crawford had been shot ten times. The officer fired 11 shots. Brown and Stenger claim they fired in self-defense.

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An aerial view showing the route of Clayton Crawford's truck after he was shot by RCMP officers at the Chickadee Creek rest stop near Whitecourt on July 3, 2018. The road is Highway 43 near Whitecourt.
An aerial view showing the route of Clayton Crawford’s truck after he was shot by RCMP officers at the Chickadee Creek rest stop near Whitecourt on July 3, 2018. The road is Highway 43 near Whitecourt. Photo by supply

“Plum Crazy”

The events leading to Crawford’s death began the day before at Valhalla Centre, a hamlet east of Grande Prairie, more than 300 kilometers northwest of Chickadee Creek’s resting place.

Crawford, 31, was at a home in the Valhalla Center known for drug activity when an unidentified assailant opened fire through the door and injured Crawford’s girlfriend. Crawford then fled the scene in his pickup, an old model Dakota with the words “Plum Crazy” engraved in purple.

Grand Prairie RCMP Cpl. Eldon Chirog testified Wednesday that Crawford was believed to have stolen drugs and money from dealers in the city. A BOLO (be on the lookout for) notice was issued to He said Crawford’s car was included because officers wanted to talk to Crawford to find out why someone tried to shoot him. emphasized that it was not

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The next day, an off-duty Grand Prairie RCMP officer traveling on State Route 43 spotted Crawford’s truck at a Chickadee Creek rest stop.

In Paddick’s testimony Thursday, Crown Prosecutor Linda Singh said Paddick about what steps he and his colleagues took to determine the role the purple truck owner played in the shooting. was rigorously questioned.

Paddick said he and other officers believed the purple truck driver was a suspect in the shooting and could be arrested for aggravated assault, but how they came to that conclusion. I had a hard time explaining how I got there.

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He, Brown, and Stinger enlisted in hopes of a “high-risk” takedown, as they believed the suspect had a gun. Paddick said it informed the decision to “have lethal force ready in case it is needed.”

A chef’s knife and a machete-type cutlery were recovered from the truck, but no gun was found.

During cross-examination, Brown’s defense attorney, Rob Beeman, attempted to highlight the dangers RCMP officers face in confrontations involving vehicles.

“People involved in the drug trade often don’t care about public safety,” Beeman suggested, particularly highlighting the risks posed by those who use methamphetamine.

“I agree,” Paddick replied.

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“Does the police know that people who use drugs often behave irrationally?”

“correct.”

Beeman later drew attention to the fact that Crawford had disobeyed police orders after waking up.

“He ignores your orders… He drops his hands, bows his head, and gets under the dash. Like you told us, it’s incredibly threatening.”

“I agree with that.” Paddick replied.

“The fact that he is ignoring police orders is very dangerous. It amplifies the risk.”

Paddick agreed.

The trial will begin Monday and is expected to last three weeks.

jwakefield@postmedia.com

twitter.com/jonnywakefield

A bullet hole in the door of Clayton Crawford's truck. Crawford said he was shot 10 times by RCMP officers on July 3, 2018.
A bullet hole in the door of Clayton Crawford’s truck. Crawford said he was shot 10 times by RCMP officers on July 3, 2018. Photo by supply
Evidence markers showing the location of artillery shells fired by RCMP members at Clayton Crawford on July 3, 2018.
Evidence markers showing the location of artillery shells fired by RCMP members at Clayton Crawford on July 3, 2018. Photo by supply
Bullets recovered after RCMP fired 10 shots at Clayton Crawford at a rest stop near Whitecourt, Alta, July 3, 2018. RCMP Cpl. Randy Stenger and Const. Jessica Brown began her trial on charges including manslaughter on November 21, 2022.
Bullets recovered after RCMP fired 10 shots at Clayton Crawford at a rest stop near Whitecourt, Alta, July 3, 2018. RCMP Cpl. Randy Stenger and Const. Jessica Brown began her trial on charges including manslaughter on November 21, 2022. Photo by supply

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Mounty, who witnessed police shooting, says he believed victim was suspect, not witness

Source link Mounty, who witnessed police shooting, says he believed victim was suspect, not witness

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