Canada

Cohen: Sorry King Charles — Canada doesn’t need a part-time head of state

The monarchy thrives with its own pomp and pomp. But we have a Governor who lives in a grand home on a wooded property in Ottawa and travels abroad as our representative.

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One of the arguments in favor of the Canadian monarchy is that it makes Canada different from the United States. It’s a storied institution that Canadians have, and Loyalists squeal, but Americans don’t.

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Being different from the United States is the driving force behind our identity. we live and breathe it. The Union took place in 1867, fearing that the Americans would absorb us. Our uniqueness is our national aspirations, even our emblem.

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So if Canada is considering severing ties with the royal family and becoming a republic, expect to hear the debate.

But does this banal claim that our new head of state, King Charles III, makes us unique? Was he an ordinary human being? unlikely.

In the United States, the roles of head of government and head of state are merged. Both roles are invested in the president. Due to the office’s extraordinary powers, the president is famously called the most powerful man in the world (only men were in the position).

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His responsibilities include Commander-in-Chief, Economic Manager and Chief Executive Officer. Since the dawn of the atomic age in 1945, the agency’s powers have grown. A president could trigger a nuclear war, and this he made horrifyingly evident during his Cuban missile crisis in 1962.

The president can also fight regular wars without a declaration of war from Congress, as he did in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.

There is no doubt that the Presidency has its own dignity and its own ritual. The White House and Camp David, the US Marine Band (President’s Own), Air Force One – all provide a sense of grandeur. If this head of state wants to serve his guests a sumptuous meal on his plane, no one will complain. (In Canada, the Pinchpenny Kingdom of Tall Poppy Syndrome, howls.)

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As head of state, the president embodies the values ​​of the country at home and abroad. Although he represents his one of his three branches of government, he is in some ways considered the state itself.

Canada is different. The prime minister is the head of the executive branch. In that capacity he travels abroad and meets foreign counterparts. The governor-general is actually the head of state and in practice rarely exercises constitutional powers.

The Governor-General’s powers grew after the war.However, GG is our de facto Head of State, the King of England is our Legal Head of state.

The King of England is the King of Canada as he is the King of Australia, New Zealand and many other Commonwealth members. What are the peculiarities of him sharing his monarchy with other nations?Like his mother, Charles III visits Canada, but he never lives here. Is this something to celebrate?

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The monarchy thrives with its own pomp and pomp. But the reality is that we have a Governor-General who lives in a grand home on a wooded property in Ottawa and travels abroad as our (Vice-Royal) representative.

Sure, a governor-general doesn’t have the height of an American president, but how could she in a country one-ninth the size of America? The argument that we need a living part-time head of state is empty.

What is the difference with Canada? It’s not hard to see. Medicare, bilingualism, peacekeeping (when we did it), pure multilateralism, liberal immigration, and hockey fanaticism. A history of moderation, diversity and tolerance. Aversion to guns. progressive country.

In over 155 years we have never had a colony, never waged a war of conquest, never fought alone.

Dismantling the monarchy will not make us more American. We become more Canadian. The United States will remain a great republic and we will become the new republic of North America. It will be the logical final step in our nation-building and march to maturity.

Andrew Cohen Journalist, professor at Carleton University, and author of Two Days in June: John F. Kennedy and the 48 Hours That Made History.

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Cohen: Sorry King Charles — Canada doesn’t need a part-time head of state

Source link Cohen: Sorry King Charles — Canada doesn’t need a part-time head of state

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