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Appeal for “Grabber” license plates dismissed by NS Supreme Court

Jay Cameron, Grabber’s lawyer and head of proceedings at the Judicial Center for Constitutional Freedom, said Grabber’s team was “disappointed with the decision” and the license plate harmed someone. He added that there was no evidence. Cameron also stated that the name was of Austrian and German origin.

“In order to make his name something meaningful, he needs to translate his name into English and add words to it. This was what the government did and then censored them. “Cameron said. Canadian press. “I think there is still a problem with the interpretation of the law here.”

Lawyers also explained that “grabbers” were also used on Alberta license plates, and a Manitoba court had previously ruled that the charter did not apply to personal license plates.

read more: The court battle over “socially unacceptable” license plates reignites

Grabher first brought the matter to court in 2017, claiming that the registrar’s decision violated his charter’s right to freedom of speech. However, in August last year, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeals unanimously upheld the judge’s decision that license plates are not an area to which freedom of speech applies.

Cameron replaces Grabber with a government-owned personal license plate in an appeal to the Supreme Court Charter of rights and freedom.

Appeal for “Grabber” license plates dismissed by NS Supreme Court

Source link Appeal for “Grabber” license plates dismissed by NS Supreme Court

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